Epstein-Barr Virus update: Electromagnetic fields induce activation

Share

Exposure to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field induces activation of the Epstein-Barr virus genome

EMF-PORTAL

According to the 14th Report on Carcinogens (RoC) released by the USA’s National Toxicology Program (NTP) in Nov 2016, the Epstein Barr virus is now a known human carcinogen based on sufficient evidence from human studies.

They say it is more likely to lead to cancer in people that have weakened immune systems or immunosuppression and given that vaccines are not available, prevention is critical for reducing potential cancer risks.

Epstein-Barr virus: https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/content/profiles/viruses_ebv.pdf

https://www.niehs.nih.gov/news/newsroom/releases/2016/november3/index.cfm

https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/pubhealth/roc/index-1.html

And this study reported that approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV): “DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations”  [Jul 2017, Oxid Med Cell Longev.]


Exposure to a 50 Hz electromagnetic field induces activation of the Epstein-Barr virus genome in latently infected human lymphoid cells.

Grimaldi S, Pasquali E, Barbatano L, Lisi A, Santoro N, Serafino A, Pozzi D
Published in: J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol 1997; 16 (2-3): 205-207

Abstract: The EBV genome in latently infected lymphoid cells offers an opportunity to follow effects on the transcriptional and translational product clearly distinguishable from those of the host cell genome. Exposure of Akata cells, a human lymphoid cell line latently infected by the EBV genome, to a 50 Hz EMF resulted in an increased number of cells expressing the virus early antigens. This finding provides additional evidence that DNA can be modulated by a magnetic field.

Aim: To study the effects of electromagnetic fields on the Epstein-Barr virus replication.

Background: Human B lymphocytes latently infected with the Epstein-Barr virus genome was used as model system to monitor the effect of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields.

Outcome: No statistically significant difference was found in the growth rates of exposed and non-exposed cells. Exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field resulted in an increased number of cells expressing the virus antigens (18% activation of the EBV genome compared to 4% in the control cells). This finding provides evidence that DNA can be modulated by a magnetic field.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9276003

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.